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prepositional adverb

Prepositional Adverb | Definition, Details, Uses and Examples

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Every word has its form and function, describing how it appears and behaves within a sentence. New language speakers regularly get confused by prepositional adverb, which take the form of a preposition. In other words, they are commonly used as prepositions, such as ‘in,’ ‘on,’ and ‘around.’ 

Prepositional Adverb Definition

prepositional adverb definition

“A prepositional adverb is an adverb that functions like a preposition. It follows the same grammar, and structure as a preposition, however, we use it as an adverb in a sentence.”

If you consider the sentence, ‘She fell down.’ the word ‘down’ is much like a preposition such as ‘Walk down the stairs.’

 As in the second example, a prepositional adverb is often found at the end of a sentence and should not be followed by an object part of a prepositional phrase.

On the other hand, prepositional adverb doesn’t include an object after them. It provides information about where something is located or happening, such as “on the table” or “under the bed.”

As an adverb, a prepositional adverb describes or modifies a verb and the action taking place. When we say, “We can walk outside,” “outside” is a prepositional adverb that modifies the verb “walk.” 

It serves the same function as an adverb such as “quickly” in the sentence “We can walk quickly,” but takes the form of a preposition rather than the familiar adverb form ending in “-ly”.

The adverbs in both of these examples, however, provide additional information and modify the verb.

However, one difference between a prepositional adverb and the other type is that it can usually be moved around within a sentence.

“We can quickly walk,” could also be rewritten as “We can walk quickly.”  However, We can’t move a prepositional adverb since it has the form of a preposition.

For example, “We can outside walk,” the sentence may still be understandable, but is grammatically incorrect to use. 

Adverbs often come at the end of a sentence and are not followed by an object, as with prepositions. “Think outside the box,” uses “outside” as a preposition, which requires the object “box” for meaning.

Prepositional Adverb List

prepositional adverb list

Here is a complete list of prepositional adverbs. The proper use of these prepositional adverbs is important to understand first.

  1. About
  2. Above
  3. Across
  4. After
  5. Ahead
  6. Along
  7. Around
  8. Away
  9. Back
  10. Behind
  11. Below
  12. Beneath
  13. Beside
  14. Beyond
  15. Down
  16. Far
  17. Forth
  18. Forward
  19. Here
  20. In
  21. Inside
  22. Near
  23. Off
  24. On
  25. Out
  26. Over
  27. Past
  28. Round
  29. Through
  30. To
  31. Under
  32. Up

What Prepositional Adverb Do in a Sentence?

The prepositional adverb modifies the verb or verbs or provide additional information about the location or direction of an action in a sentence.

Prepositional Adverb Examples

  1. He ran ahead to catch up with the others.
  2. She jumped over the fence bravely.
  3. They searched high and low for the missing keys.
  4. The bird flew up into the sky.
  5. The child climbed down from the tree.
  6. Stephen swam across the river to reach the other side.
  7. She, suddenly, looked around to get her lost bearings.
  8. How did we walk along the beach, hand in hand!
  9. The car veered off the road after hitting the truck.
  10. He dived deep into the swimming pool.
  11. My dog dashed out of the room surprisingly.
  12. I stepped outside the room to enjoy the fresh air from the garden.
  13. We gathered around the campfire at night for warmth.
  14. The plane passed away overhead, leaving a trail of white thick smoke.
  15. He suddenly slipped through the narrow steps.
  16. The little baby danced around the room joyfully.
  17. She trekked up the steep and difficult mountain path.
  18. I sat beneath the shade of my house.
  19. The big stone rolled down the hill.
  20. He stood atop the hill, enjoying the weather.
  21. Emma hid behind the curtain to surprise me.
  22. I waited patiently in line for my turn.
  23. The old truck sped ahead, leaving the other trucks behind.
  24. The baby slept soundly through the night.
  25. The old man peered through the window cautiously.
  26. We sat together on the bench, talking about issues.
  27. The fireworks burst overhead, brightening the sky in the dark night.
  28. Who hung the painting above the fireplace?
  29. I held her breath underwater for as long as I could.
  30. She stood in front of the room mirror, admiring her reflections.

How to avoid the wrong use of Prepositional Adverb in the sentences?

When you go through subject-verb agreement, then you can have a better idea for the proper use of prepositional adverb. Let’s have a few examples to understand its function in a sentence.

  • Incorrect: She jumped off from the diving board.
  • Correct: She jumped off the diving board.
  • Incorrect: The little boy climbed up on the tree.
  • Correct: The little boy climbed up the tree.
  • Incorrect: I searched high in and low for the missing pen in the class.
  • Correct: I searched high and low for the missing pen in the class.
  • Incorrect: The bird flew up into in the sky.
  • Correct: The bird flew up into the sky.
  • Incorrect: I swam across over the Indus River to reach the other side.
  • Correct: I swam across the Indus River to reach the other side.
  • Incorrect: She looked around about to get her lost bearings.
  • Correct: She looked around to get her lost bearings.
  • Incorrect: We walked along by the beach, hand in hand.
  • Correct: We walked along the beach, hand in hand.
  • Incorrect: He dived down deep in into the ocean.
  • Correct: He dived deep into the ocean.
  • Incorrect: She stepped outside out to enjoy the fresh air.
  • Correct: She stepped outside to enjoy the fresh air.
  • Incorrect: We gathered around by the campfire for warmth.
  • Correct: We gathered around the campfire for warmth.
  • Incorrect: The plane flew above over, leaving a trail of white  smoke.
  • Correct: The plane flew overhead, leaving a trail of white smoke.
  • Incorrect: His hand slipped through by the gaming laptop.
  • Correct: His hand slipped through the gaming laptop.
  • Incorrect: She walked around over the room happily.
  • Correct: She walked around the room happily.
  • Incorrect: She sat beneath under the shade of the tall tree.
  • Correct: She sat beneath the shade of the tall tree.
  • Incorrect: The ball rolled down from the stairs.
  • Correct: The ball rolled down the stairs.
  • Incorrect: I stood atop over the hill, enjoying the view.
  • Correct: I stood atop the hill, enjoying the view.

I’ve gathered preposition that start with N showing some proper use of prepositional adverbs in the sentence. Take advantage of my best research.

 Summing Up

Prepositional adverb doesn’t include an object after them. It provides information about where something is located or happening. These prepositional adverbs can modify verbs or provide additional information about the location or direction of an action in a sentence.

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Faisal Kiani
Faisal Kiani

Muhammad Faisal Kiani is an expert SEO Copywriter, Content Analyst, Strategist, and career counselor. He is enriched by the dynamic experience of 26 years in sales & marketing, management, recruiting, content creation, and career counseling. He currently provides the best SEO Copywriters training course for beginners.

Faisal Kiani has a creative, innovative, and unique approach to SEO copywriting with more than a million words floating in the digital ocean. He prepares beginner to advanced levels courses of SEO Copywriting through Amazon Affiliate Blogging, landing pages, and Product Descriptions. He is amongst one of the best freelance trainers for SEO Copywriters.

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